About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10
. controversial right-to-work measures will soon be the law of the land in michigan. republican governor rick snider signed the law despite wide protests at the capitol. the law will make it illegal for a union employee to pay union dues as a condition of their employment. >> let's explain that. just for half a second. then we'll go on. right to work, what does it mean? people ask me, what does it mean? it means unions can force somebody to pay them if they want to get a job in the state of michigan. >> well, what it means is, if you get a job, the union extracts money from your paycheck for the dues for union dues. >> well, yeah. >> automatically. >> automatically. >> you've got no choice. oh, you want to work here? well, you've got to pay us. >> right. >> what if i don't want to pay you? what if i don't want to support the candidates you support? what if they're the antithesis of my values? too bad. and so i've never understood this. >> governor snider says it was the unions who started the fight in the first place. by trying to add collective bargaining rights in the state's constitution.
open between the speaker and the president. president obama took his argument to michigan yesterday, where he also weighed in on a right to work all that's making its way through the state today -- a right to work law. do you support or oppose those laws? michigan will become the 24th state to have one. the phone lines are open. also, send us a tweet or a facebook post, or send us an e- mail. here's what the president said yesterday in michigan. [video clip] >> these right to work law don't have to do with economics. they have everything to do with politics. what they are really talking about is giving you the right to work for less money. [cheers and applause] you only have to look to michigan, where workers were instrumental in reviving the auto industry and to see how unions have helped to build not just a straw upper-middle-class but a stronger america -- stronger middle-class but a stronger america. people and should be focused on the same pink. they should be working to make sure companies like this manufacturer is able to make more great products. that's what they should be f
in michigan, democratic caller. go ahead. >> caller: yes. i have a two-part question. i was wondering, for one, i'm going to be retiring here in another 12 years but i'm not going to have social security until probably the age of 70. i'm 50 now. and i was wondering, right now if i was to lose my job for some unforeseen reason, i will lose my benefits. i have the option, as an employee to keep my benefits at a about $800 cost. but when senators and congressman step out of their position, i'm not mistaken, they still have their insurance for life. and then the second part of the question, that i am posing is, i believe they are going to get a 3% pay raise every year and i have never seen in my lifetime them stop that. i was wondering if that is something could be possibly done? >> host: isabel sawhill. >> guest: i assume what you're talking about is that if you were to lose your job you would lose your benefits, you mean primarily your health care benefits. and you're right. you would lose them. under the affordable care act once it is implemented in 2014, that would enable you to go on an excha
that we get our economy in full gear. wand that i yield to mr. levin. >> the gentleman from michigan. >> i did not know i would follow the distinguished majority leader. i just want to say i mostly want to talk about plan c but for him or anybody else to come on the floor and say the president hasn't proposed spending cuts, it isn't true and it undercuts the necessary level of trust to find common ground. that kind of a statement should not be made. i said in the rules committee for three hours, participated for two last night. there was no reference to plan c. and it came up just a few minutes secretly before midnight. the purpose of plan c is to try to get votes for plan b twn republican conference. and what it does is to undermine the affordable care act by eliminating the protections and it would result in the loss of health insurance coverage for 420,000 people. it would repeal the block grant, is social services block grant, services for millions of americans and it wasn't machine years ago when chairman camp wrote ssg has been a key source of funding -- of flexible funding for criti
, smaller business owners. the 10 to go after people from flint, michigan, not so, in tennessee. by a large we're talking to smaller investors, entrepreneurs, business owners. host: what are the members concerns with the fiscal cliff stocks? -- talks? guest: for most small-business owners and senior executives at big companies, the fear is that going over the cliff, even on a technical term, will increase their borrowing costs and will put our economic recovery at risk. most business leaders point to simpson-bowles. they understand that we have to raise revenue and we also have to control spending. they generally like the outlines of the simpson-bowles deal, the principles behind it. spread the cost, protect the most vulnerable, don't disrupt the economic recovery, try to simplify the tax code. they generally support those principles. host: do they believe a recession could happen if we fall off the so called "fiscal cliff?" guest: they do. what we saw last year is business leaders were concerned that washington was not going to come together with a deal. and that it could end badly, but it
article that spoke about the wrecking crew. when you wreck the whole state of michigan, and the jobs go down to the south. the south feels very happy about getting all the jobs, but michigan goes through maybe 25 or 30 years of dismantling. that's why we have all the programs trying to save people's skin and life and nourishment. the constitution says to promote the general welfare. host: i apologize. we have to keep moving. this in the new york times -- carl in west virginia, republican line. you are on the washington journal. good morning. caller: good morning. i watched your show every morning and sometimes i get a big laugh out of you guys. if you read every article with something negative about the republican party. you have straw men set up. first you blamed george bush for four more years. now you are blaming grover norquist. he is the bogeyman of the democrats now. in order for a republican to get back in power, we are going to have to infiltrate the news media and we are going to have to infiltrate the educational system, because our kids are absolutely being indoctrinated in o
oversight. host: in michigan, lawrence is a democrat prepared -- a democrat. caller: as far as all the security and coverage that we have for mental health issues, will there be any more money coming from homeland security for mental health issues? we need better coverage. host: lawrence, before we let you go, do you have any sense how your local community uses, and security grant? what michigan does with the money gets from the federal government? caller: i do know we have politicians the do their best. what exactly do, i'm not sure. guest: the issue of mental health is certainly a major one facing the u.s. ran out and what happened with the tragic incidents as last week underscored the need some for mental health. -- the need for mental health. health and human services, hhs, has units that help state allen local communities address their mental health issues. host: do citizens generally have an idea what their states are using the homeland security grants for? is it on the website or their clearing houses? guest: we issued a report earlier this year that looked specifically at t
for charitable giving. back to the phones. jack in allenson, michigan, on our line for independents. go ahead, jack. caller: i want to ask mr. rosenberg if he has ever heard of lincoln electric in cleveland, ohio. host: and why did he wanted to know that? caller: well, they wrote a book, james f. lincoln wrote a book, a new approach to industrial economics where they have no unions. everybody is responsible for their own work. they do peace work. everybody's responsible. everybody has a lifetime job. they get huge pieces of the pie. and ownership is -- the people, the workers, everybody owns the piece of the pie. host: what does this have to do with the fiscal cliff? caller: well, if more -- if more people -- if more industries would go to that, they wouldn't fall off the cliff. everybody would go to work. host: mr. rosenberg? guest: so i haven't heard of that but it sounds like a great place to be and live. i would have to get the name of that again. host: next up is don on the washington redskins. -- "washington journal." caller: i've been on social security for several years now. it's my u
spent 21 months recuperating from his wounds in an army hospital in michigan. there he met a lifetime friend, future majority leader bob dole, another young g.i. who had been also wounded in the european theater. senator dole told senator inouye he planned to go to law school and eventually serve in congress. dan inouye was elected to congress in 1959 as hawaii's first congressman. bob dole was elected to congress a year later. senator inouye always joked, i went with the dole plan and i beat him. three years later, dan inouye was elected to the senate and he's been a soft and powerful voice for the people of hawaii ever since. although senator inouye was an unabashed progressive democrat, he always put his country first and his party second. dan was a vibrant and vital presence in the senate and in death he'll remain a legend. his last words on earth, aloha. and it is with a heavy heart that i and we bid aloha, goodbye, i love you to a friend and legend of the senate, daniel ken inouye. >> good morning. on behalf of the united states house of representatives, i extend sincere condo l
on religion and whether it and loved politics. loraine and michigan. republican number. caller: it influences my voting because -- acs, like before, that is a religion. i should have a right to vote with our savior. a country founded on the bible is not a country at all -- makes it very clear. you have to have your belief system. without it, i think a that will exist. host: kathleen, of riverside, ohio. democratic caller. caller: i grew up catholic and went to catholic school but i am no longer a catholic. i would not define myself as a catholic. i got into comparative religious studies in college. i found that my core value system was based -- or still is based on some of the religious or spiritual values i learned of the catholic church and also by studying other religions. and i found some of those core values very similar to things in the competition about fairness and justice. so, i do find that those motivating factors are my core values learned within the catholic church and unions and actually reading the constitution, they are very similar. and i find myself looking at them -- lookin
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10